Patterned floor finishes and stair nosing. What is best.

AS 1428 2009 Stair Nosing Standards

DDA Disability Standard on Access to Premises the Premises Standard Legislation.
The Disability Discrimination Act (DDA) enacted by parliament does not include technical specifications for stair construction that can be used to check for compliance.

The Commission has given advice and guidelines to many industry, community and government bodies.

The DDA have been working with the Australian Building Codes of Australia Board (BCA) to develop a DDA Disability Standard on Access to Premises known as the (Premises Standard).

This put simply is no one can discriminate against those with disabilities when it comes to equal access to premises.

The”Premises Standard”, will provide architects, builders and certifiers with design and construction specifications which will meet the requirements of both the DDA (the Government Act) and BCA.

Everyone deserves to have equal access to buildings.

Haven’t you noticed that over the last few years, lifts have been appearing in buildings, when back in the 1970’s if you were unlucky enough to live on the 5th floor you had to hike it up the stairs?

Specially designed ramps for wheelchairs and those that need assistance to walk have appeared everywhere in new buildings when gaining access . They have to be designed in a special way, such as the gradient of the slope.

When you step off a set of traffic lights at a pedestrian crossing , there actually is no step, it is a wide ramp with tactiles on it, wide enough for a wheelchair or a motorised scooter to have equal access to crossing a road.

The DDA in passing their Access to Premises Standards had a good hard look at stair nosings, tactiles, bollards, and discovered that they completely discriminated in most part to the visually impaired.

Stair nosings are not just meant to aid the visually impaired, they are a major slip deterrent so common sense must prevail.

The Australian Standard (The Premises Standard) put forward by the DDA has no compulsory power, but the Building Code of Australia (BCA) has accepted this standard put forward AS1428.1 and has mandated compulsory compliance with that Standard.

This is now enforceable by law on new building sites and major refurbishments. It is not retrospective; UNLESS the stair structure undergoes structural changes.

It is very important to note that using the excuse that my building was built in 2001 means I don’t have to install stair nosings is incorrect.

Prior to 2009 a lot of stair nosing inserts were less than 50 mm, many 43 mm.

Some stair treads and stair nosings were “tiger striped”. This means that the contrast luminescent strip which must be 50 mm is not in one colour.

AS 1428 2009 Stair Nosing StandardsOne could definitely argue that they do not comply post 2009.

Many manufacturers and those that had stock such as ourselves, were caught out and had to comply and throw out our nosings that did not have a 50mm insert

If your stairs were built prior to 2009 then you do not have to replace the stair nosings.

If however you are doing a refurbishment, then you are required to comply with the AS1428 2009 standards

AS1428 Standards Released December 2009

AS 1428. Part 1—2009 Design for access and mobility-Part 1: General requirements for access— new building work

1 Stairways
11.1 Stair construction
Where required, stairs shall be constructed as follows:

  • Stairs shall have opaque risers. [Not able to be seen through; not transparent.]
  • Stair nosings shall not project beyond the face of the riser and the riser may be vertical or have a splay backwards up to a maximum 25 mm
  • Stair nosing profiles shall:
    • have a sharp intersection
    • be rounded up to 5 mm radius
    • be chamfered up to 5 mm × 5 mm.
  • At the nosing, each tread shall have a strip not less than 50 mm and not more than 75 mm deep across the full width of the path of travel.
  • Insert strip extends the full length of the stair nosing
  • The strip may be set back a maximum of 15 mm from the front of the nosing. The strip shall have a minimum luminance contrast of 30% to the background.
  • Where the luminance contrasting strip is not set back from the front of the nosing then any area of luminance contrast shall not extend down the riser more than 10 mm.

As you know the Disability Discrimination Act (DDA) does not include technical specifications that can be used to check for compliance, as the DDA does not set up regulations but is only an advisory body.

Never the less the BCA does require compliance

In 1998 the BCA bought out a checklist for compliance. Remember the BCA mandates compulsory compliance with the Standard. It was as early as this that they stated that each stair had to have a strip of contrasting colour at least 25mm wide on the edge of the nosing.

Eighteen years later we now walk around on old stairs that have faded white or yellow paint on the edge with crumbling stair edges!

AS 1428 2009 Stair Nosing Standards – Luminance Contrast
  • Highlighting nosings on treads on stairways assists, in the main, people with a vision impairment; however, all members of the community benefit from this application.

The highlighted nosing is used to indicate the location of the nosing or leading edge of the tread to ensure safe movement up and down the stairway by all members of the community.

  • People with a vision impairment may not be able to locate the edge of the tread on a stairway if the top of the nosing does not have adequate highlighting to distinguish one tread from the next, thus making it extremely difficult for them to use the steps safely.
    luminance contrast AS1428 2009

    luminance contrast AS1428 2009

  • The minimum luminance contrast to the adjacent tread/going colour is achieved.
    Continuous depth across the full width of every tread/going. The depth of the contrast nosing area must be between 50 – 75mm to ensure its visibility by users.
  • When located at the front of a stair nosing, the luminance contrast strip cannot extend down the riser more than 10 mm

Examples of incorrect luminance contrast for AS1428 2009 and not complying with the minimum 50mm contrast strip across the full width of the step

AS 1428 2009 Stair Nosing StandardsAS 1428 2009 Stair Nosing Standards

Luminance Contrast in the AS1428 2009 Stair Nosing Standards

I am finding that the industry still likes to look of the tiger striped stair nosing. The standards ask for a “solid” colour which

implies one colour not many or striped, as vision impaired people need to see a solid band of colour.

Examples of incorrect luminance contrast for AS1428 2009 and not complying with the minimum 50mm contrast strip across the full width of the step

In this picture the following applies:

compliant stair nosings luminance contrast

  • The minimum luminance contrast to the adjacent tread/going colour is achieved.
    Continuous depth across the full width of every tread/going. The depth of the contrast nosing area must be between 50 – 75mm to ensure its visibility by users.
  • When located at the front of a stair nosing, the luminance contrast strip cannot extend down the riser more than 10 mm

The contrast strip is black, and does not extend down the face of the riser

AS 1428 2009 Stair Nosing Standards – Stair nosing profile dimensions 10 mm ?

Everybody including manufacturers believed that the 10 mm riser/face meant that you could no longer install nosings that had for example a 25 mm face or a 30 mm face.

This is incorrect.

The standards state the following:

(g) Where the luminance contrasting strip is not set back from the front of the nosing then any area of luminance contrast shall not extend down the riser more than 10 mm.

The image below shows that the grey contrast does not extend down the riser.

luminance contrast AS1428 2009

Yes absolutely, as discussed before the standards state quite clearly.

REMEMBER: Clause 11 of the Standard specifically addresses requirements for stairways and stair nosings and in this regard focuses almost entirely on promoting luminance contrast at the leading edge of step treads together with the avoidance of overhang at the front of stair treads.

Just remember the rule:
The body of the stair nosing can extend any distance down the riser. If the luminance contrast strip is located at the front of the stair nosing then that strip cannot extend down the riser more than 10 mm.

heavy duty stair nosing

People have to lift their feet high enough to place on the tread.  The body of the stair nosing, so long as it is clearly differentiated from the luminance contrast strip, can extend to any depth on the riser

Everywhere. The stair nosing with a 10 mm face are more aesthetically pleasing. On porcelain, ceramics, terrazzo we install a lot of 10 mm profile because they look nice.

BUT it is all about safety, so what looks good and what is safe should be the rule.

This nosing in anodised gold with a 10 mm face and a P5 slip rating looks great, and when installed on level hard surfaces is excellent

You can clearly see that these two 10 mm stair nosings would not be safe on a concrete aggregate paver.

This was never meant to be the case.

.

This is correct. This shows clearly the leading edge of the step. The contrast is more than 30% and the strip is 50mm

Yes. One should have this discussion with the architect, surveyor to ensure everyone understands the AS1428 2009 standards. Safety is paramount.

Remember it is about luminance contrast not the size of the riser.

The body of the stair nosing can extend any distance down the riser. If the luminance contrast strip is located at the front of the stair nosing then that strip cannot extend down the riser more than 10 mm.

  

Opaque risers are no longer compliant and are very dangerous.

The standard states no open risers therefore opaque and no protruding or overhanging treads.

Open risers in stairways cause particular access difficulties for people with a vision impairment, especially if there is a light source coming from behind the stairs. Open risers or overhanging
treads/goings that result in lips on each step also make upwards movement very difficult for people with mobility disabilities who are able to use stairs.

Open risers can cause people with certain types of vision impairment to experience vertigo as they ascend a flight of stairs due to the strobing effect of the stair treads/goings and the light between each tread/going.

AS 1428 2009 Stair Nosing Standards

DDA Disability Standard on Access to Premises the Premises Standard Legislation.
The Disability Discrimination Act (DDA) enacted by parliament does not include technical specifications for stair construction that can be used to check for compliance.

The Commission has given advice and guidelines to many industry, community and government bodies.

The DDA have been working with the Australian Building Codes of Australia Board (BCA) to develop a DDA Disability Standard on Access to Premises known as the (Premises Standard).

This put simply is no one can discriminate against those with disabilities when it comes to equal access to premises.

The”Premises Standard”, will provide architects, builders and certifiers with design and construction specifications which will meet the requirements of both the DDA (the Government Act) and BCA.

Everyone deserves to have equal access to buildings.

Haven’t you noticed that over the last few years, lifts have been appearing in buildings, when back in the 1970’s if you were unlucky enough to live on the 5th floor you had to hike it up the stairs?

Specially designed ramps for wheelchairs and those that need assistance to walk have appeared everywhere in new buildings when gaining access . They have to be designed in a special way, such as the gradient of the slope.

When you step off a set of traffic lights at a pedestrian crossing , there actually is no step, it is a wide ramp with tactiles on it, wide enough for a wheelchair or a motorised scooter to have equal access to crossing a road.

The DDA in passing their Access to Premises Standards had a good hard look at stair nosings, tactiles, bollards, and discovered that they completely discriminated in most part to the visually impaired.

Stair nosings are not just meant to aid the visually impaired, they are a major slip deterrent so common sense must prevail.

The Australian Standard (The Premises Standard) put forward by the DDA has no compulsory power, but the Building Code of Australia (BCA) has accepted this standard put forward AS1428.1 and has mandated compulsory compliance with that Standard.

This is now enforceable by law on new building sites and major refurbishments. It is not retrospective; UNLESS the stair structure undergoes structural changes.

It is very important to note that using the excuse that my building was built in 2001 means I don’t have to install stair nosings is incorrect.

Prior to 2009 a lot of stair nosing inserts were less than 50 mm, many 43 mm.

Some stair treads and stair nosings were “tiger striped”. This means that the contrast luminescent strip which must be 50 mm is not in one colour.

AS 1428 2009 Stair Nosing StandardsOne could definitely argue that they do not comply post 2009.

Many manufacturers and those that had stock such as ourselves, were caught out and had to comply and throw out our nosings that did not have a 50mm insert

If your stairs were built prior to 2009 then you do not have to replace the stair nosings.

If however you are doing a refurbishment, then you are required to comply with the AS1428 2009 standards

AS1428 Standards Released December 2009

AS 1428. Part 1—2009 Design for access and mobility-Part 1: General requirements for access— new building work

1 Stairways
11.1 Stair construction
Where required, stairs shall be constructed as follows:

  • Stairs shall have opaque risers. [Not able to be seen through; not transparent.]
  • Stair nosings shall not project beyond the face of the riser and the riser may be vertical or have a splay backwards up to a maximum 25 mm
  • Stair nosing profiles shall:
    • have a sharp intersection
    • be rounded up to 5 mm radius
    • be chamfered up to 5 mm × 5 mm.
  • At the nosing, each tread shall have a strip not less than 50 mm and not more than 75 mm deep across the full width of the path of travel.
  • Insert strip extends the full length of the stair nosing
  • The strip may be set back a maximum of 15 mm from the front of the nosing. The strip shall have a minimum luminance contrast of 30% to the background.
  • Where the luminance contrasting strip is not set back from the front of the nosing then any area of luminance contrast shall not extend down the riser more than 10 mm.

As you know the Disability Discrimination Act (DDA) does not include technical specifications that can be used to check for compliance, as the DDA does not set up regulations but is only an advisory body.

Never the less the BCA does require compliance

In 1998 the BCA bought out a checklist for compliance. Remember the BCA mandates compulsory compliance with the Standard. It was as early as this that they stated that each stair had to have a strip of contrasting colour at least 25mm wide on the edge of the nosing.

Eighteen years later we now walk around on old stairs that have faded white or yellow paint on the edge with crumbling stair edges!

AS 1428 2009 Stair Nosing Standards – Luminance Contrast
  • Highlighting nosings on treads on stairways assists, in the main, people with a vision impairment; however, all members of the community benefit from this application.

The highlighted nosing is used to indicate the location of the nosing or leading edge of the tread to ensure safe movement up and down the stairway by all members of the community.

  • People with a vision impairment may not be able to locate the edge of the tread on a stairway if the top of the nosing does not have adequate highlighting to distinguish one tread from the next, thus making it extremely difficult for them to use the steps safely.
    luminance contrast AS1428 2009

    luminance contrast AS1428 2009

  • The minimum luminance contrast to the adjacent tread/going colour is achieved.
    Continuous depth across the full width of every tread/going. The depth of the contrast nosing area must be between 50 – 75mm to ensure its visibility by users.
  • When located at the front of a stair nosing, the luminance contrast strip cannot extend down the riser more than 10 mm

Examples of incorrect luminance contrast for AS1428 2009 and not complying with the minimum 50mm contrast strip across the full width of the step

AS 1428 2009 Stair Nosing StandardsAS 1428 2009 Stair Nosing Standards

Luminance Contrast in the AS1428 2009 Stair Nosing Standards

I am finding that the industry still likes to look of the tiger striped stair nosing. The standards ask for a “solid” colour which

implies one colour not many or striped, as vision impaired people need to see a solid band of colour.

Examples of incorrect luminance contrast for AS1428 2009 and not complying with the minimum 50mm contrast strip across the full width of the step

In this picture the following applies:

compliant stair nosings luminance contrast

  • The minimum luminance contrast to the adjacent tread/going colour is achieved.
    Continuous depth across the full width of every tread/going. The depth of the contrast nosing area must be between 50 – 75mm to ensure its visibility by users.
  • When located at the front of a stair nosing, the luminance contrast strip cannot extend down the riser more than 10 mm

The contrast strip is black, and does not extend down the face of the riser

AS 1428 2009 Stair Nosing Standards – Stair nosing profile dimensions 10 mm ?

Everybody including manufacturers believed that the 10 mm riser/face meant that you could no longer install nosings that had for example a 25 mm face or a 30 mm face.

This is incorrect.

The standards state the following:

(g) Where the luminance contrasting strip is not set back from the front of the nosing then any area of luminance contrast shall not extend down the riser more than 10 mm.

The image below shows that the grey contrast does not extend down the riser.

luminance contrast AS1428 2009

Yes absolutely, as discussed before the standards state quite clearly.

REMEMBER: Clause 11 of the Standard specifically addresses requirements for stairways and stair nosings and in this regard focuses almost entirely on promoting luminance contrast at the leading edge of step treads together with the avoidance of overhang at the front of stair treads.

Just remember the rule:
The body of the stair nosing can extend any distance down the riser. If the luminance contrast strip is located at the front of the stair nosing then that strip cannot extend down the riser more than 10 mm.

heavy duty stair nosing

People have to lift their feet high enough to place on the tread.  The body of the stair nosing, so long as it is clearly differentiated from the luminance contrast strip, can extend to any depth on the riser

Everywhere. The stair nosing with a 10 mm face are more aesthetically pleasing. On porcelain, ceramics, terrazzo we install a lot of 10 mm profile because they look nice.

BUT it is all about safety, so what looks good and what is safe should be the rule.

This nosing in anodised gold with a 10 mm face and a P5 slip rating looks great, and when installed on level hard surfaces is excellent

You can clearly see that these two 10 mm stair nosings would not be safe on a concrete aggregate paver.

This was never meant to be the case.

.

This is correct. This shows clearly the leading edge of the step. The contrast is more than 30% and the strip is 50mm

Yes. One should have this discussion with the architect, surveyor to ensure everyone understands the AS1428 2009 standards. Safety is paramount.

Remember it is about luminance contrast not the size of the riser.

The body of the stair nosing can extend any distance down the riser. If the luminance contrast strip is located at the front of the stair nosing then that strip cannot extend down the riser more than 10 mm.

  

Opaque risers are no longer compliant and are very dangerous.

The standard states no open risers therefore opaque and no protruding or overhanging treads.

Open risers in stairways cause particular access difficulties for people with a vision impairment, especially if there is a light source coming from behind the stairs. Open risers or overhanging
treads/goings that result in lips on each step also make upwards movement very difficult for people with mobility disabilities who are able to use stairs.

Open risers can cause people with certain types of vision impairment to experience vertigo as they ascend a flight of stairs due to the strobing effect of the stair treads/goings and the light between each tread/going.

AS 1428 2009 Stair Nosing Standards

DDA Disability Standard on Access to Premises the Premises Standard Legislation.
The Disability Discrimination Act (DDA) enacted by parliament does not include technical specifications for stair construction that can be used to check for compliance.

The Commission has given advice and guidelines to many industry, community and government bodies.

The DDA have been working with the Australian Building Codes of Australia Board (BCA) to develop a DDA Disability Standard on Access to Premises known as the (Premises Standard).

This put simply is no one can discriminate against those with disabilities when it comes to equal access to premises.

The”Premises Standard”, will provide architects, builders and certifiers with design and construction specifications which will meet the requirements of both the DDA (the Government Act) and BCA.

Everyone deserves to have equal access to buildings.

Haven’t you noticed that over the last few years, lifts have been appearing in buildings, when back in the 1970’s if you were unlucky enough to live on the 5th floor you had to hike it up the stairs?

Specially designed ramps for wheelchairs and those that need assistance to walk have appeared everywhere in new buildings when gaining access . They have to be designed in a special way, such as the gradient of the slope.

When you step off a set of traffic lights at a pedestrian crossing , there actually is no step, it is a wide ramp with tactiles on it, wide enough for a wheelchair or a motorised scooter to have equal access to crossing a road.

The DDA in passing their Access to Premises Standards had a good hard look at stair nosings, tactiles, bollards, and discovered that they completely discriminated in most part to the visually impaired.

Stair nosings are not just meant to aid the visually impaired, they are a major slip deterrent so common sense must prevail.

The Australian Standard (The Premises Standard) put forward by the DDA has no compulsory power, but the Building Code of Australia (BCA) has accepted this standard put forward AS1428.1 and has mandated compulsory compliance with that Standard.

This is now enforceable by law on new building sites and major refurbishments. It is not retrospective; UNLESS the stair structure undergoes structural changes.

It is very important to note that using the excuse that my building was built in 2001 means I don’t have to install stair nosings is incorrect.

Prior to 2009 a lot of stair nosing inserts were less than 50 mm, many 43 mm.

Some stair treads and stair nosings were “tiger striped”. This means that the contrast luminescent strip which must be 50 mm is not in one colour.

AS 1428 2009 Stair Nosing StandardsOne could definitely argue that they do not comply post 2009.

Many manufacturers and those that had stock such as ourselves, were caught out and had to comply and throw out our nosings that did not have a 50mm insert

If your stairs were built prior to 2009 then you do not have to replace the stair nosings.

If however you are doing a refurbishment, then you are required to comply with the AS1428 2009 standards

AS1428 Standards Released December 2009

AS 1428. Part 1—2009 Design for access and mobility-Part 1: General requirements for access— new building work

1 Stairways
11.1 Stair construction
Where required, stairs shall be constructed as follows:

  • Stairs shall have opaque risers. [Not able to be seen through; not transparent.]
  • Stair nosings shall not project beyond the face of the riser and the riser may be vertical or have a splay backwards up to a maximum 25 mm
  • Stair nosing profiles shall:
    • have a sharp intersection
    • be rounded up to 5 mm radius
    • be chamfered up to 5 mm × 5 mm.
  • At the nosing, each tread shall have a strip not less than 50 mm and not more than 75 mm deep across the full width of the path of travel.
  • Insert strip extends the full length of the stair nosing
  • The strip may be set back a maximum of 15 mm from the front of the nosing. The strip shall have a minimum luminance contrast of 30% to the background.
  • Where the luminance contrasting strip is not set back from the front of the nosing then any area of luminance contrast shall not extend down the riser more than 10 mm.

As you know the Disability Discrimination Act (DDA) does not include technical specifications that can be used to check for compliance, as the DDA does not set up regulations but is only an advisory body.

Never the less the BCA does require compliance

In 1998 the BCA bought out a checklist for compliance. Remember the BCA mandates compulsory compliance with the Standard. It was as early as this that they stated that each stair had to have a strip of contrasting colour at least 25mm wide on the edge of the nosing.

Eighteen years later we now walk around on old stairs that have faded white or yellow paint on the edge with crumbling stair edges!

AS 1428 2009 Stair Nosing Standards – Luminance Contrast
  • Highlighting nosings on treads on stairways assists, in the main, people with a vision impairment; however, all members of the community benefit from this application.

The highlighted nosing is used to indicate the location of the nosing or leading edge of the tread to ensure safe movement up and down the stairway by all members of the community.

  • People with a vision impairment may not be able to locate the edge of the tread on a stairway if the top of the nosing does not have adequate highlighting to distinguish one tread from the next, thus making it extremely difficult for them to use the steps safely.
    luminance contrast AS1428 2009

    luminance contrast AS1428 2009

  • The minimum luminance contrast to the adjacent tread/going colour is achieved.
    Continuous depth across the full width of every tread/going. The depth of the contrast nosing area must be between 50 – 75mm to ensure its visibility by users.
  • When located at the front of a stair nosing, the luminance contrast strip cannot extend down the riser more than 10 mm

Examples of incorrect luminance contrast for AS1428 2009 and not complying with the minimum 50mm contrast strip across the full width of the step

AS 1428 2009 Stair Nosing StandardsAS 1428 2009 Stair Nosing Standards

Luminance Contrast in the AS1428 2009 Stair Nosing Standards

I am finding that the industry still likes to look of the tiger striped stair nosing. The standards ask for a “solid” colour which

implies one colour not many or striped, as vision impaired people need to see a solid band of colour.

Examples of incorrect luminance contrast for AS1428 2009 and not complying with the minimum 50mm contrast strip across the full width of the step

In this picture the following applies:

compliant stair nosings luminance contrast

  • The minimum luminance contrast to the adjacent tread/going colour is achieved.
    Continuous depth across the full width of every tread/going. The depth of the contrast nosing area must be between 50 – 75mm to ensure its visibility by users.
  • When located at the front of a stair nosing, the luminance contrast strip cannot extend down the riser more than 10 mm

The contrast strip is black, and does not extend down the face of the riser

AS 1428 2009 Stair Nosing Standards – Stair nosing profile dimensions 10 mm ?

Everybody including manufacturers believed that the 10 mm riser/face meant that you could no longer install nosings that had for example a 25 mm face or a 30 mm face.

This is incorrect.

The standards state the following:

(g) Where the luminance contrasting strip is not set back from the front of the nosing then any area of luminance contrast shall not extend down the riser more than 10 mm.

The image below shows that the grey contrast does not extend down the riser.

luminance contrast AS1428 2009

Yes absolutely, as discussed before the standards state quite clearly.

REMEMBER: Clause 11 of the Standard specifically addresses requirements for stairways and stair nosings and in this regard focuses almost entirely on promoting luminance contrast at the leading edge of step treads together with the avoidance of overhang at the front of stair treads.

Just remember the rule:
The body of the stair nosing can extend any distance down the riser. If the luminance contrast strip is located at the front of the stair nosing then that strip cannot extend down the riser more than 10 mm.

heavy duty stair nosing

People have to lift their feet high enough to place on the tread.  The body of the stair nosing, so long as it is clearly differentiated from the luminance contrast strip, can extend to any depth on the riser

Everywhere. The stair nosing with a 10 mm face are more aesthetically pleasing. On porcelain, ceramics, terrazzo we install a lot of 10 mm profile because they look nice.

BUT it is all about safety, so what looks good and what is safe should be the rule.

This nosing in anodised gold with a 10 mm face and a P5 slip rating looks great, and when installed on level hard surfaces is excellent

You can clearly see that these two 10 mm stair nosings would not be safe on a concrete aggregate paver.

This was never meant to be the case.

.

This is correct. This shows clearly the leading edge of the step. The contrast is more than 30% and the strip is 50mm

Yes. One should have this discussion with the architect, surveyor to ensure everyone understands the AS1428 2009 standards. Safety is paramount.

Remember it is about luminance contrast not the size of the riser.

The body of the stair nosing can extend any distance down the riser. If the luminance contrast strip is located at the front of the stair nosing then that strip cannot extend down the riser more than 10 mm.

  

Opaque risers are no longer compliant and are very dangerous.

The standard states no open risers therefore opaque and no protruding or overhanging treads.

Open risers in stairways cause particular access difficulties for people with a vision impairment, especially if there is a light source coming from behind the stairs. Open risers or overhanging
treads/goings that result in lips on each step also make upwards movement very difficult for people with mobility disabilities who are able to use stairs.

Open risers can cause people with certain types of vision impairment to experience vertigo as they ascend a flight of stairs due to the strobing effect of the stair treads/goings and the light between each tread/going.

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